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Bill to Regulate Allied healthcare practitioners approved, What it Means for Healthcare Delivery


Bill to Regulate Allied healthcare practitioners approved, What it Means for Healthcare Delivery

The bill proposes to set up a Central and corresponding State Allied and Healthcare Councils; 15 major professional categories including 53 professions in Allied and Healthcare streams.

New Delhi: The union cabinet headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi recently approved Allied and Healthcare Professions Bill, 2018 for regulation and standardisation of education and services by allied and healthcare professionals. The bill aims at providing a better structure for bringing order in the functioning of the health-care sector and indeed comes as a breath of fresh air in a scenario where allied healthcare has been completely rejected and lacking any kind of standardisation.

The bill is going to regulate various categories of allied healthcare professionals including Physiotherpists, Nutritionists, lab technologists, dosimetrists, etc

It is estimated that the Allied and Healthcare Professions Bill, 2018 will directly benefit around 8-9 Lakh existing Allied and Healthcare related professionals in the country and several other graduating professionals joining workforce annually and contributing to the health system. However, since this Bill is directed to strengthen the healthcare delivery system at large, it may be said that the entire population of the country and the health sector as a whole will be benefited by this Bill.

The Bill empowers the Central and State Governments to make rules. The State Council will undertake recognition of allied and healthcare institutions. The bill also focuses on employment generation in the healthcare sector.

The bill proposes to set up a Central and corresponding State Allied and Healthcare Councils; 15 major professional categories including 53 professions in Allied and Healthcare streams. The bill explains for Structure, Constitution, Composition and Functions of the Central Council and State Councils,   e.g.  Framing policies and standards, Regulation of professional conduct, Creation and maintenance of live Registers, provisions for common entry and exit examinations, etc.

The bill targets to bring an Interim Council that will be constituted within 6 months of passing of the Act holding charge for a period of two years until the establishment of the Central Council. The Council at the Centre and the States are to be established as body corporate with a provision to receive funds from various sources. Councils will also be supported by Central and State Governments respectively through Grant-in-aid as needed. However, if the State Government expresses inability, the Central Government may release some grant for initial years to the State Council.

The budget required for the legislation is expected to be Rs 95 crore for the first four years, with Rs 75 crore earmarked for states and the remaining funds expected to support the central council’s operations for this duration. It is expected to create qualified, highly skilled and competent jobs in healthcare that would cater to the global shortage of healthcare workforce, which WHO has projected to touch 15 million by 2030, stated the release.

Details:

  1. Establishment of a Central and corresponding State Allied and Healthcare Councils; 15 major professional categories including 53 professions in Allied and Healthcare streams.
  2. The Bill provides for Structure, Constitution, Composition and Functions of the Central Council and State Councils,   e.g.   Framing policies and standards, Regulation of professional conduct, Creation and maintenance of live Registers, provisions for common entry and exit examinations, etc.
  3. The Central Council will comprise 47 members, of which 14 members shall be ex-officio representing diverse and related roles and functions and remaining 33 shall be non-ex-officio members who mainly represent the 15professional categories.
  4. The State Councils are also envisioned to mirror the Central Council, comprising 7 ex-officio and 21 non-ex officio members and Chairperson to be elected from amongst the non-ex officio members.
  5. Professional Advisory Bodies under Central and State Councils will examine issues independently and provide recommendations relating to specific recognised categories.
  6. The Bill will also have an overriding effect on any other existing law for any of the covered professions.
  7. The State Council will undertake recognition of allied and healthcare institutions.
  8. Offences and Penalties clause have been included in the Bill to check mal­practices.
  9. The Bill also empowers the Central and State Governments to make rules.
  10. Central Govt. also has the power to issue directions to the Council, to make regulations and to add or amend the schedule.

Targets:

  • An Interim Council will be constituted within 6 months of the passing of the Act holding charge for a period of two years until the establishment of the Central Council.
  • The Council at the Centre and the States are to be established as the body corporate with a provision to receive funds from various sources.
  • Councils will also be supported by Central and State Governments respectively through Grant-in-aid as needed. However, if the StateGovernment expresses inability, the Central Government may release some grant for initial years to the State Council.

Major Impact, including employment generation potential:

  1. Bring all existing allied and healthcare professionals on board during the first few of years from the date of establishment of the Council.
  2. Opportunity to create qualified, highly skilled and competent jobs in healthcare by enabling the professionalism of the allied and healthcare workforce.
  3. High quality, multi-disciplinary care in line with the vision of Ayushman Bharat, moving away from a ‘doctor led’ model to a ‘care accessible and team-based’ model.
  4. Opportunity to cater to the global demand (shortage) of healthcare workforce which is projected to be about 15 million by the year 2030, as per the WHO Global Workforce, 2030 report.




Source: with input
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