Maternal gum disease connected to preterm birth?

Published On 2022-06-27 03:30 GMT   |   Update On 2022-06-27 10:13 GMT

according to research presented at EuroPerio10, women with preterm births may be more likely to have gum disease compared to those with full-term births. The study also found a higher prevalence of unhealthy oral microbes in the preterm mothers. The study compared oral inflammation and microbes in women who delivered preterm (before 37 weeks of gestation) and those with full-term births. A...

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according to research presented at EuroPerio10, women with preterm births may be more likely to have gum disease compared to those with full-term births. The study also found a higher prevalence of unhealthy oral microbes in the preterm mothers.

The study compared oral inflammation and microbes in women who delivered preterm (before 37 weeks of gestation) and those with full-term births. A total of 77 women were enrolled during the first six days following childbirth. Gum bleeding was assessed at four sites around each tooth to evaluate gingival inflammation. In addition, the researchers examined pocket depth and loss of attachment at six sites around each tooth.

Plaque samples were collected from the surface of teeth and in patients with probing depths more than 3 mm they were also obtained from under the gums at different locations of the mouth. Compared to those with full-term deliveries, women with preterm births had significantly greater attachment loss, a higher percentage of pocket depths measuring 4 mm or greater, and different populations of bacteria on and under the teeth.

Researchers concluded that they found that preterm mothers were more likely to have lost supporting tissues around the teeth, have a higher proportion of sites with deep pockets, and have unhealthy oral bacteria compared with full-term mothers. Birth weight was significantly lower for mothers with periodontitis compared to mothers with good oral health or just bleeding gums but without pathological pockets.

Reference: Presented in Copenhagen Friday at a meeting of the European Federation of Periodontology.- 17/06/2022.

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