Aspirin prevents Preeclampsia and related Morbidity and Mortality: USPSTF

Published On 2021-09-30 03:30 GMT   |   Update On 2021-09-30 04:24 GMT

US Preventive Services Task Force updated its 2014 recommendation as published in the JAMA and commissioned a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin use to prevent preeclampsia. Pregnant persons at high risk for preeclampsia who have no prior adverse effects with or contraindications to low-dose aspirin were selected. The USPSTF concludes with...

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US Preventive Services Task Force updated its 2014 recommendation as published in the JAMA and commissioned a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin use to prevent preeclampsia.

Pregnant persons at high risk for preeclampsia who have no prior adverse effects with or contraindications to low-dose aspirin were selected.

The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that there is a substantial net benefit of daily low-dose aspirin use to reduce the risk for preeclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age/intrauterine growth restriction, and perinatal mortality in pregnant persons at high risk for preeclampsia.

Below is the summary of the recommendations:

· Preeclampsia is one of the most serious health problems that affect pregnant persons.

· It is a multisystem inflammatory syndrome that is often progressive but has an unclear aetiology.

· Worldwide, preeclampsia is the second most common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality.

· It is a complication in approximately 4% of pregnancies in the US and contributes to both maternal and infant morbidity and mortality.

· Preeclampsia also accounts for 6% of preterm births and 19% of medically indicated preterm births in the US.

· There are racial and ethnic disparities in the prevalence of and mortality from preeclampsia.

· Non-Hispanic Black women are at greater risk for developing preeclampsia than other women and experience higher rates of maternal and infant morbidity and perinatal mortality than other racial and ethnic groups.

· In the US, the rate of maternal death from preeclampsia is higher among non-Hispanic Black women than non-Hispanic White women.

· Disparities in risk factors for preeclampsia, access to early prenatal care, and obstetric interventions may account for some of the differences in prevalence and clinical outcomes.

· These disparities largely result from historical and current manifestations of structural racism that influence environmental exposures, access to health resources, and overall health status

Reference:

Aspirin Use to Prevent Preeclampsia and Related Morbidity and Mortality: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

doi:10.1001/jama.2021.14781



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Article Source : JAMA

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