Oral Mucosal Lesions Linked with IBD in Pediatric Patients, finds study

Published On 2022-01-11 00:30 GMT   |   Update On 2022-01-11 00:36 GMT

The oral cavity may be the first site of mucosal changes that may represent local mucosal disease and systemic conditions or be part of a broader systemic involvement. A recent study suggests that repeated changes in the oral mucosa may be one of the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents. The study findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports on...

Login or Register to read the full article

The oral cavity may be the first site of mucosal changes that may represent local mucosal disease and systemic conditions or be part of a broader systemic involvement. A recent study suggests that repeated changes in the oral mucosa may be one of the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents. The study findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports on November 09, 2021.

Studies have shown the relationship between the severity of caries or gingivitis and the activity status of the disease process in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, which may be related to the composition of saliva, colonization with specific bacteria strains or the diet used. In the present study, Dr Małgorzata Klichowska-Palonka and her team evaluated the nature of changes in the oral cavity at the time of diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in children compared to children without systemic diseases.

In this study, the researchers included 60 children without systemic diseases and 49 children with inflammatory bowel disease,16 diagnosed with Crohn's disease (CD)and 33 with ulcerative colitis (UC). They assessed the CD activity using the PCDAI scale (pediatric Crohn's diseases activity index) and UC using the PUCAI scale (pediatric ulcerative colitis activity index). They further performed oral cavity examinations before the beginning of treatment of IBD.

Key findings of the study:

  • Upon analysis, the researchers found that the prevalence of the aphthae stomatitis and angular cheilitis was 24.5% in the examined group and 10% in the control group.
  • They also found that the changes in the oral mucosa occurred more frequently in children with Crohn's disease 35.3% than with ulcerative colitis 18.7%.
  • They noted that among children with Crohn's disease, the most frequently observed lesion was aphthous stomatitis 23.5%, and in ulcerative colitis, angular cheilitis 12.5%.

The authors concluded, "The appearance of repeated, inflammatory changes in the oral mucosa, inflammation of the lips or the corner of the mouth may be one of the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents."

They further added, "Interdisciplinary cooperation between dentists, paediatricians and gastroenterologists in both diagnosis and treatment is essential for early diagnosis and improve patients' quality of life."

For further information:

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-01370-8


Tags:    
Advertisement
Article Source :  Scientific Reports

Disclaimer: This site is primarily intended for healthcare professionals. Any content/information on this website does not replace the advice of medical and/or health professionals and should not be construed as medical/diagnostic advice/endorsement or prescription. Use of this site is subject to our terms of use, privacy policy, advertisement policy. © 2020 Minerva Medical Treatment Pvt Ltd

Our comments section is governed by our Comments Policy . By posting comments at Medical Dialogues you automatically agree with our Comments Policy , Terms And Conditions and Privacy Policy .

Similar News