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Are healers becoming predators? New Publication delves into corruption in medical fraternity


Are healers becoming predators? New Publication delves into corruption in medical fraternity

New Delhi: Are healers becoming predators? How does one differentiate between a genuine medical mistake and an act of corruption that defrauds patients and their families?

These were some of the questions that were discussed by a panel of experts here, including eminent doctors to thresh out the issue of corruption in the medical fraternity in the country and the way forward.

The occasion was the Delhi launch of the book ‘Healers or Predators?’ which has essays by contributors from both within and outside the medical fraternity, with a forward by Nobel laureate Amartya Sen.

The book explores the many facets of corruption — from exorbitant billing by the corporate hospitals to the non-merit-based selection in medical colleges to the questionable motives playing strong in the are of organ transplant, according to the Oxford Union Press, the publisher of the voluminous book.

Dr Samiran Nundy, emeritus consultant at the Sir Ganga Ram Hospital here, and one of the co-editors of the book, said, “We need to inculcate ethics into our system. At present, the scenario does not seem very good.”

UK-born doctor David Berger, and former non-executive director of British Medical Journal Publishing Group, who currently serves at Broome Hospital in a remote part of Western Australia, said, India has its own challenges, which is different from the ones faced in other countries.

“The right approach would be strengthening of the rural medical infrastructure and system,” he said.

On the occasion, former Union law minister Salman Khurshid made a reference to the Gorakhpur children tragedy in which nearly 60 children had died due to lack of oxygen at a state-run hospital there last year.

“There is a failure of the rural health system in Uttar Pradesh as the case suggests,” he alleged.

Dr Vinod Paul, member, NITI Aayog, said, there are issues in the country but there is a way forward.

“And, we are working on bringing about a change. Current private hospitals are working on low volume and high return model, a disruption has to be created in the system to have high volume and moderate return at least,” he said.

The other two editors of the book are — Keshav Desiraju, former Union health secretary and currently chairman, Population Foundation of India; and Sanjay Nagral, a consultant surgeon, department of surgical gastroenterology, at Jaslok Hospital, Mumbai.



Source: PTI
10 comment(s) on Are healers becoming predators? New Publication delves into corruption in medical fraternity

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  1. user
    Prof. A. H. Shera July 15, 2018, 10:50 pm

    The basic problem is adoption of wrong policies at the highest level of decision making. All rules and regulations are made to favor corporations. Doctors and other health care professionals are made just pawns in the hands of corporations, government regulators, judiciary, law enforcement agencies and the public. Selection to the medical courses is not merit based. It determined by caste considerations, financial considerations, region considerations and all other considerations except the merit. This very unfortunate. Second is the policy of creating facilities in private sector. All rules are in favor of big corporations run by politicians, business houses and others who possess the muscle or money power. There is no encouragement for doctors or the actual professionals. How can ethics come into the system when consideration is only the business. Third is the axe of law and order. This works on proofs and comparison with Western technology. There is hardly any element of faith on practitioners, at least in the corridors of power. So to keep the proof and cross check the things more investigations have become necessary which cost money. The policy regarding the manufacture and distribution of drugs is full of flaws. There is no quality control. Any body can manufacture and distribute drugs in India. You just need to have some muscle or money. The decision making process is completely in the hands of the non professional people. The net sufferers are the patients, their families and the health care professionals. Those people are crying wolf and make pleas for improving the system who are the greatest pollutants. In this scenario you really need a devine help to clean the system. Let us hope it happens someday and old system returns that was based on honesty, dedication, fair play and non interference by unscrupulous elements.

  2. user
    SYLVESTER ROMERO July 15, 2018, 5:41 am

    I AM NOT SURE WHAT IT TAKES TO BECOME A GOOD DOCTOR IN INDIA TODAY. I WORK AS A PROFESSOR. THE STUDENTS MOSTLY JOIN TO HAVE AN MBBS TAG. THE MEDICAL EDUCATION SELECTION IS BIASED. HALLMARKS OF OUR PROFESSION LIKE DEDICATION AND COMMITMENT ARE NON EXISTENT. A BIG DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DOCTORS OF PREVIOUS GENERATIONS. IF PRIVATE COLLEGES RUN ON CAPITATION AND THE COUNTRY HAS NO HEALTH BUDGET JUST MAKING PLANS ON PAPER IS FUTILE. IN SHORT, THE ENTIRE MEDICAL EDUCATION SYSTEM AND HEALTH CARE OF THE COUNTRY NEEDS TO BE REVAMPED. THIS SYSTEM WORKS ON MONEY NOT INTELLECT AND HENCE WE WILL REMAIN MUTE AND MERE SPECTATORS.

  3. Medical seats should be given only on merit why this reservation policy not ending after so many years of independence. All parents have desire to give education to their children general merit people don\’t have future in India so the brain drain.central government should take this matter serious and change this system and make one law one nation I hope God will help us

  4. user
    Sunitha Varghese July 14, 2018, 2:43 pm

    The privitisation of Medicine without a system of regularisation coupled with just a bare skeleton of a Public health system has led to this situation as we see in India today. It should have been foreseen decades ago and adequate structures and systems should have been laid then.

  5. With medical negligence issues on the rise,only God can save the haples patients .