Whole spine MRI may detect radiological findings in suspected child abuse

Published On 2022-01-19 03:30 GMT   |   Update On 2022-01-19 03:30 GMT

Leesburg: According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), whole-spine MRI commonly demonstrates isolated thoracolumbar injuries in children with suspected abusive head trauma."When performing spine MRI in children with suspected abusive head trauma, whole-spine MRI rather than cervical spine MRI may be warranted, to avoid missing isolated thoracolumbar...

Login or Register to read the full article

Leesburg: According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), whole-spine MRI commonly demonstrates isolated thoracolumbar injuries in children with suspected abusive head trauma.

"When performing spine MRI in children with suspected abusive head trauma, whole-spine MRI rather than cervical spine MRI may be warranted, to avoid missing isolated thoracolumbar injuries," clarified first author Boaz Karmazyn from Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children.

Karmazyn and team's retrospective study included 256 children (170 boys, 86 girls; mean age, 5.9 months) who, from January 2019 to December 2020, underwent skeletal survey and head MRI for suspected child abuse. Children with suspected abusive head trauma also underwent whole-spine MRI, per institutional protocol. Diagnoses for abusive head trauma were established via clinical record review, as well as injuries described in skeletal survey, head MRI, and head CT (if performed) reports.

Of the 148 total children with suspected abusive head trauma who underwent whole-spine MRI, 23.0% of examinations demonstrated injuries localized to the thoracolumbar spine. Injuries were localized to the thoracolumbar spine in 51.1% of examinations with major findings: subdural hematoma, epidural hematoma, ligamentous injury, or fracture not identified by skeletal survey.

Tags:    
Advertisement
Article Source : American Journal of Roentgenology

Disclaimer: This site is primarily intended for healthcare professionals. Any content/information on this website does not replace the advice of medical and/or health professionals and should not be construed as medical/diagnostic advice/endorsement or prescription. Use of this site is subject to our terms of use, privacy policy, advertisement policy. © 2020 Minerva Medical Treatment Pvt Ltd

Our comments section is governed by our Comments Policy . By posting comments at Medical Dialogues you automatically agree with our Comments Policy , Terms And Conditions and Privacy Policy .

Similar News