UP's first skin bank at KGMU to start in 3-4 months

The state's first skin bank is likely to start functioning within three to four months and will prove to be a boon for critically injured patients.

Published On 2022-10-05 04:30 GMT   |   Update On 2022-10-05 04:30 GMT

Lucknow: The state's first skin bank for burn injury patients coming up at the King George's Medical University is being developed using the corporate social responsibility (CSR) fund and will prove to be a boon for critically injured patients.Prof Vijay Kumar, Head of Department, plastic surgery, King George's Medical University (KGMU), said, "The process is going on to procure a...

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Lucknow: The state's first skin bank for burn injury patients coming up at the King George's Medical University is being developed using the corporate social responsibility (CSR) fund and will prove to be a boon for critically injured patients.

Prof Vijay Kumar, Head of Department, plastic surgery, King George's Medical University (KGMU), said, "The process is going on to procure a walk-in-fridge, van for transporting skin and other equipment. The skin bank is planned in a 1500-square feet area in the department."

Also Read:Lucknow: KGMU to soon get 500-bed emergency trauma centre

He further said construction work of the building as well as and the process of procurement of other equipment, including biosafety cabinet, skin donation vehicle, cold room, sealer, shaking incubator, dermatome, and the walk-in fridge, has started.

The state's first skin bank is likely to start functioning within three to four months and will prove to be a boon for critically injured patients.

The skin bank is being developed using the corporate social responsibility (CSR) fund.

He added that a skin bank is a place where skin from a donor, mostly from those who wish to donate organs after death, is harvested and preserved. Later, it is used in grafting in severe burn patients as they usually have no place on the body from where skin can be extracted to cover deep burn injuries for faster healing.

"We are planning to use cryoprotective glycerol to preserve skin for up to three weeks, and then with the help of deep freezers, we will try to preserve it for up to three to six months," he informed.

Another faculty member, Prof Bhavya Naithani, said as of now the chances of patients with severe burns (over 55 percent) catching an infection are much higher due to the absence of a skin bank.

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